7 Things to Inspect when Buying a House that Inspectors & Agents Don’t

Image 7 Thins to Inspect when Buying a House that Inspectors and Agents DontYou are about to discover 7 things that you MUST inspect before you buy a house and you are the one that has to do this because most inspectors and agents don't! Furthermore, these 7 verification steps can make or break your decision to buy a house, whether you are purchasing to live in the house or to invest in long term. That's why this is mandatory for anyone buying a home to watch or read. This wisdom was gathered from decades in this business and thousands of deals of experience. You may not have ever heard of these things before but that are absolutely crucial to your home purchasing decision.

 

1. Inspect HVAC Ducts for Mold

Either yourself, or have your inspector, review the ducting and the air handling unit(s) for mold. A system can function extremely well and yet still breed mold and that can produce very bad air quality for the people inside the house. And the only solution, if mold is present, is to replace the whole system (even if it is functioning properly and is a fairly new system).

 

2. Inspect on a Rainy Day

Either yourself, or have your inspector, review the property on a rainy day. It reveals where the water flows and that is an extremely important part of owning a house.

 

3. Flood Zone Proximity

Even if you are not in a flood zone, you still want to study where your property is located in relation to flood zones because houses flood that are near flood zones too.

FEMA Flood Zone Map

 

4. Sinkhole Proximity

Florida is among the most sinkhole prone areas on earth and knowing where your house is, in relation to a previously reported sinkhole, is extremely important to know before you buy that house.

Florida Sinkhole Map

NOTE! After shooting this video, I realized that this sinkhole map that I use only extends across the state of Florida. Sorry about that.

 

5. Review the Entire Sales History

Reviewing the entire sales history of a house can be very educational because a home that has been bought and sold a significant number of times may indicate that its been a problem for its previous owners. The tool I personally use to investigate the history of a house is PropStream because it's the greatest research tool in real estate history.

 

6. Vary Your Visits to the Property

Don't visit the house you are going to buy at the exact same time of day and day of week, over and over again, prior to closing. Instead, vary your visits so that you can see it at different times of day, with different weather patterns and on different days of the week. And in a perfect world, you would see it during different seasons of the year (spring, summer, fall and winter).

 

7. Interview the Neighbors

Perhaps no other inspection action, prior to buying a house, is more important and effective than interviewing the neighbors. Ask them key questions like, "What are the most frustrating things about living here?" and "If you could own any house in this neighborhood, what would it be and why?". While not every neighbor will be 100% honest, by interviewing enough of them, you'll begin to learn things that you could learn no other way about owning a property in that location.

 

And if you have any other tips of things that Inspectors and Agents typically do not inspect for home buyers but can be incredibly helpful to prospective house purchasers, share them below!

Comments

  1. Hi there . Just wanted you to know I am watching your videos , and very much appreciate the one you just sent about the 7 things to watch for when buying . Remove the heat duct and check for mold . This is a golden nugget . Some of the info you are sending is focused , and just the stuff I need . Makes me feel much better to watch your videos and really helps with butterflies . Thank you PHIL . Really need your help . Damn glad that I figured out that Arkansas is a Flood State before I went on impulse – cause could’ve got stuck with a Turkey by now . You’re very much needed by all us newbies out here . Don’t ever underestimate the Value of what you’re doing . Kinda saved my life ! Thanks again . D. LONG – CA.

  2. Checking Title is also vital to your success .

  3. Rolando Martinez says

    Thanks Phil great information as always.

  4. FRANCES M. WILLIAMS says

    My ‘Biggest Thing’ is, always check good for ‘Cockroaches’ and ‘Termites’ and even Mice Poop in the ‘Basement.’ Also,
    check the ‘Foundation’ for damage from ‘Earthquakes.’ You could be buying a ‘House’ that’s ‘Unstable.’ And, always
    check the ‘Plumbing’ (i.e. Turn on all the ‘Faucets’), and the ‘Heating’ elements.’ Most of all, make sure there’s ‘No Lien’ on the ‘Property.’ That’s got to be it for me in addition to the 7 warnings above.

  5. Very good information. Helps a lot, especially with me buying a house that has a trashed vent system, which I will have to redo. Now mine will fit my house. I also appreciate hearing about the UV and anti mold units I can install inside the air system. I will be watching again, and taking notes. God bless you Phil Pustejovsky.

  6. john s. thomas says

    I watch all of Phils videos. They are very very informative. He has a lot of experience and is more than willing to
    share all of his experiences with us. Great guy .
    Thanks Phil

  7. This is besides this topic. If an insurance company refuses to pay for damage to a roof do you need a lawyer present when you meet to discuss their refusal. The management company says that all of their other properties that were damage by a wind storm were covered by their insurance, this insurance company says the roofs are at a point to be repaired anyway and theirfor are not coveed

  8. William T Sides says

    Thank you for all of your info & knowledge. Currently I am in transition with living arrangements and finan are extremely low. But please keep sending me your info. I have kept everything. And I review them often. And I plan to get started once on my feet and able.
    Thank you again.

    Wil.

  9. I enjoy your videos!

  10. I purchased a home a while ago with a VA loan end after closing, moved in and started looking around more and discovered that the wiring going into the main panel from the pole barn had been spliced from a smaller gauge wire to a larger gauge wire just before entering into the panel, like whoever wired the pole barn ran short of wire! Can’t believe the VA appraiser missed that! The back steps also had several cracks but yet they let it go. I was under the belief that the veteran was supposed to be cared about more and also the mortgage company was supposed to be informed of things like these and require the seller to repair items like these!

  11. Christopher says

    I love the all the advice and especially ” chit chatting ” with the neighbors. Having a timely good conversation with them is valuable.

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